Critical

See if you can discover the origins and meaning of this image of the world in a fool’s cap. Google World in a Fools Cap… and take it from there.

Little is known about the creator or his motives for the map, which has left it shrouded in mystery for a very long time. There have been speculations of who created it and when they did it, but there are too many inconsistencies in these theories and to this very day experts are still unsure. There are suttle clues on the map as to what the creator believed and was trying to highlight through this clever map. I believe that the creator of this image was attempting to highlight the foolish and vain nature of his society by condensing a world map into a court jesters outfit. Furthermore, I believe the creator of the image is alluding to the fact that individuals must assume the roll of a jester or fool if they are to accurately understand the world in which they live in. This idea is evident in the careful usage of biblical and latin phrases all throughout the map. “Vanitie of vanities, all is vanity”. The creator of the image quotes from the old testament book of Ecclesiastes, which deals extensively with the concepts of pride, greed, wealth, vanity and wisdom. Another latin phrase found on the image is “know thyself”, which works in conjunction with the bible quote to show how the creator feels.

A cartographic mystery.

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2 thoughts on “Seventh Shakespeare blog post (Week 10, Friday 12th of May)

  1. Hello there, Jesse – I also picked this topic for this week’s blog and it’s fascinating reading what others put down for it. I do agree that the map’s intention was definitely to highlight the foolishness and vanity of the people in the world with the use of the jester and the Fool. Especially with how the Fool is seen as being far more aware of the world compared to many others in Shakespeare’s plays. There are a few spelling errors such as “suttle” (subtle) and “roll” (role) but overall, you got your main point across and I like how simple and straightforward it is. Good work!

    Like

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